Category Archives: Training and Resources

RSA Professional Development Webinar: Careers in Academic Publishing

The Renaissance Society of America (RSA) is delighted to announce that the next professional development webinar will explore the topic of careers in academic publishing. The event will be held Tuesday, May 25 at 12:00 p.m. EDT.

Panelists include Sara K. Austin, Editor-in-Chief of the Huntington Library Quarterly; Christopher McKeen, Senior Editorial Assistant at Cambridge University Press; and Erika Suffern, Head of Publications at the Modern Language Association.

Register online. You must be logged in as a current RSA member to register for the webinar.

RSA Webinar Series: Online Renaissance Dance Workshop

RSA members are invited to attend an online workshop on Renaissance dance with Dorothy Olsson and Peggy Murray on Sunday, May 2, 2021, from 2 to 3:30 PM EDT.

The workshop introduces some of the popular western European dances from the late 16th and early 17th centuries, including pavane, branle and gaillarde. After a brief discussion about dance sources, participants will have the opportunity to try steps for some simple yet enjoyable dances (with recorded music). A handout will be available. Participants should wear comfortable flat or low-heeled shoes. No prior dance experience is necessary! Registration required.

This online workshop will be recorded and posted on the RSA webinar page following the event. Visit the RSA webinar page for more resources about research, teaching, and fellowships and grants.

Resource Portal on Anti-Racism and Decolonial Approaches to Art History and Visual Culture

The Association for Art History’s “Resource Portal on Anti-Racism and Decolonial Approaches to Art History and Visual Culture” contains hundreds of references arranged along subject, themes and media in eight bibliographies. The portal provides access to materials on anti-racist, postcolonial, and decolonizing art histories and is meant for anyone conducting research in those areas in art history or in visual or spatial culture. The portal is also meant to support academics in making meaningful changes in their departments, their teaching and their research.

The resource portal was conceived and initiated by members of the Association’s Higher Education Committee, compiled by Edwin Coomasaru with guidance from Amy Tobin and Joanna Woodall, and supported by contributors to a crowd-funding initiative. Community members are encouraged to contribute to the bibliographies. Visit the resource portal to access the eight bibliographies.

RSA members are also invited to contribute to the RSA Student Community’s resource lists.

The World in the Book: 1300-1800: Newberry Library Undergraduate Seminar

Tuesday, September 28, 2021 – Thursday, December 9, 2021
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Tuesdays and Thursdays
1–2:30 pm CST
Online

Led by Lia Markey, Rebecca Fall, and Christopher Fletcher, Newberry Library

Centuries before television, smartphones, and social media, books were the primary means by which people made sense of the world around them. In cultures throughout the world, manuscripts and printed materials of all kinds were used to archive professional and personal lives, cultivate relationships with the divine, care for minds and bodies, and visualize faraway lands and peoples. Today, these books stand as material witnesses to medieval and early modern efforts to engage with major social, intellectual, and cultural challenges.

Hosted by the Newberry Library’s Center for Renaissance Studies (CRS), this 10-week course will use the multidisciplinary field of book history to explore how medieval and early modern people used different media—theological texts, maps, travel narratives, reference works, literature, and more—to make sense of a changing world. Through lectures, discussions, and interactive workshops with faculty from CRS consortium institutions, participants will learn how book history can illuminate the ways in which premodern people used religion, science, art, and technology to grapple with new economic, intellectual, and cultural challenges in a rapidly-expanding global community. In so doing, students will develop a framework for using the past to help illuminate and guide their own contemporary experience.

Format

Hosted by the Newberry Library’s Center for Renaissance Studies (CRS), this 10-week course will use the multidisciplinary field of book history to explore how medieval and early modern people used different media—theological texts, maps, travel narratives, reference works, literature, and more—to make sense of a changing world. Through lectures, discussions, and interactive workshops with faculty from CRS consortium institutions, participants will learn how book history can illuminate the ways in which premodern people used religion, science, art, and technology to grapple with new economic, intellectual, and cultural challenges in a rapidly-expanding global community. In so doing, students will develop a framework for using the past to help illuminate and guide their own contemporary experience.

Confirmed Guest Speakers

Claudia Brittenham, University of Chicago
Kevin Gosner, University of Arizona
Elizabeth Hebbard, Indiana University
Stephanie Leitch, Florida State University
Ryan Netzley, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale
Julia Schleck, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
JB Shank, University of Minnesota
Jyotsna Singh, Michigan State University

Cost and Registration

This seminar is free and open for undergraduate students in any field of medieval or early modern studies, but space is limited. Priority will be given to undergraduates from CRS consortium institutions.

To apply for the course, complete the online application form on the Newberry website. Credits for the course will be given by students’ home institutions. Accepted students must make arrangements with their home institutions to receive credit for the course. Please direct any questions to renaissance@newberry.org.

California Rare Book School August 2021

California Rare Book School is a continuing education program dedicated to providing the knowledge and skills required by professionals working in all aspects of the rare book community, and for students interested in entering the field.

Founded in 2005, CalRBS is a project of the Department of Information Studies at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at UCLA. CalRBS is supported by an informal consortium of many of the academic and research libraries and antiquarian booksellers of Southern California.

Week One: 2–6 August, 2021

Digital Humanities for the History of the Book – Catherine DeRose
Critical Approaches, Zines, and Maker Spaces – Sean Pessin
History of the Renaissance Book – Craig Kallendorf & Daniel J. Slive
Critical Librarianship in Praxis – Emily Drabinski
Better Teaching with Rare Materials: Critical Approaches – Michaela Ullmann
Feminist Bibliography – Sarah Werner

Week Two: 9–13 August, 2021

Libraries and Social Justice: Through an Indigenous Lens – Sandy Littletree
Descriptive Bibliography – Gerald Cloud
Illustrated Scientific Books in Early Modern Europe – Daniela Bleichmar
History, Identification, and Preservation of Photographic Materials – Gawain Weaver
Developing and Administering Ethnic and Cultural Heritage Collections – Tamar Dougherty
CalRBS Director’s Intensive: Book History and Librarianship through Post- and De-Colonial Lenses – Robert D. Montoya

Week Three: 16–20 August, 2021

Donors & Libraries – Susan M. Allen & William P. Barlow, Jr.
Global Histories of the Book: Asia/Europe – Devin Fitzgerald
Communications and Grant-Writing for Libraries and Special Collections – Snowden Becker
Exhibiting Rare Books & Ephemera: Physically & Digitally – Marianne Lamonaca
Data Ethics and Activism in Practice – Stacy Wood
Rare Book Cataloging – Randal Brandt
Scientific and Secular Manuscripts – Melissa Conway & Cynthia White

Applications for a CalRBS tuition scholarship will be accepted until June 4, 2021 for all courses. For more information and how to apply please visit: http://www.calrbs.org/admissions/